Ryan M. Church

Pssst – #Authors – Wanna try an Online Plot Generator?

In Uncategorized on February 16, 2017 at 1:03 am
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My Ten Favorite Writing Tools

In Uncategorized on October 31, 2016 at 11:06 pm

Author Don Massenzio

Top 10 Favorite Author Tools

low_poly_scrivener_icon_by_benwurth-d71zc46Scrivener – Scrivener is an excellent tool for authors who are working on their first draft. It’s corkboard feature allows you to lay out chapters and rearrange them as you see fit. It is the closest thing to the old index card method without all of the paper.

There are also a number of built in tools like a name generator and others that make this a worthwhile platform for writing your first draft.

The drawbacks of Scrivener include the lack of a version for the iPad. This causes me to carry both a Window-based tablet and an iPad with me when I travel along with my work laptop which I can’t use for writing.

Also, there is no discernable way to track changes which causes me to switch to Microsoft Word when I switch to editing mode.

wordWord – It’s hard to beat Microsoft…

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#FirstLineFriday

In Uncategorized on June 17, 2016 at 3:18 pm

This torch has been passed into my hands thanks to Rami Ungar at Rami Ungar the Writer. This is the first time I have been invited to participate in an interactive pass it on type of post. So as it was passed on to me – I give you this posts proper introduction.

Now if you don’t know what #FirstLineFriday is, let me explain. On Fridays, you:

  1. Create a post on a blog entitled #FirstLineFriday, hashtag and all.
  2. Explain the rules like I’m doing now.
  3. Post the first one or two lines of a potential short story, a story-in-progress, or a completed or published story.
  4. Ask your readers for feedback and encourage them to try #FirstLineFriday on their blogs as well (tagging is encouraged but not necessary).

As I looked over at first lines from other stories. I discovered I had a style in which my first lines are short statements that lead into that line that draws you in. For those stories that I wrote that way I am not sure I would get very good feedback, because, these first lines give weight, backbone, background and tone for the fourth or fifth line. But here is a first line I wrote that I fell in love with all over again when I rediscovered it.

“The gray afternoon was pleasantly warm with a sweet salty vanilla breeze that whispered westward off the Atlantic.”

  • Does this opening line suggest genre?
  • or a relationship between the POV and the setting?
  • Is it compelling?
  • Does it promise possibility?
  • What do you think?